2018 Social

JAWS AGM Dinner Photos - 24th Nov 2018

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JAWS Cryptic Quiz Night -    a report from Phil and Brenda C

51 JAWS members, family and friends enjoyed (we think and hope !) our quiz night - 7 teams pitted their wits and vast knowledge against 9 rounds of varied and challenging topics, with the strong scoring again underlinning the very impressive cerebral horsepower of of JAWS - or was it primarily family and friends who upped the scoring ?! It was a closely fought contest, won by “Team Luscombe” who pretty well led from the wire, and were rewarded with not only the honour of winning, but also with very tasteful and collectible medals.

A lot of thanks are in order - to Mike and Mary Holder for a brilliant music round and heroic efforts on scoring and organising the question and answer sheets, to Brian Kay for his invaluable IT consultancy, to Glenys Stone and Sue Holehouse for helping set up Village Hall, and to Ann Tenant who provided universally acclaimed food. Phil and Brenda Cox were the principal question setters, so we take the full rap for any complaints ! 

But the main thanks are to all of you who participated -  you made it a terrific evening and very many thanks for coming, participating, and helping to clear up afterwards, leaving our Village Hall in immaculate condition - and yes....there is even talk of another Quiz next year

Report on the trip to Greatmore EFW by Pauline Keyne

 Since Thursday 19th July, 14 JAWS members know a lot more about waste management and treatment leading to electricity production thanks to Sue who organised their trip to Greatmoor. Our guide, Jez, started with a presentation explaining the whole process before we all kitted up in hi-viz jackets, hard hats, safety glasses, boots and gloves to see each stage as it happens. It starts with waste – that would otherwise be destined for landfill – being delivered to Greatmoor, from across the county and beyond, in huge trucks which empty their contents into bays. This isn’t tipping, but rather the waste is conveyed out of the container by moving panels, and looks – forgive the analogy – rather like excretion.

Once in the bays, 2 huge and balletic grabbers are in constant motion moving the stuff around and every now and again lifting grabs (6 tonnes each) into hoppers. This is monitored to avoid big and inconvenient items such as mattresses, fridges and gas bottles being included in the next stage of processing. No-one is quite sure how these items end up in the trucks, but they’re not welcome. (Occasionally a gas bottle is missed and explodes, but fortunately the furnaces are sturdy enough to withstand the blast.)

From the hoppers, the waste is treated chemically, burned in sloping floored furnaces, the gases dealt with and the ferrous material extracted by huge magnets. The strict limits for emissions of noxious gases are much more stringent than those imposed on other types of energy generation, so the result is cleaner than conventional power stations as well as reducing the landfill requirement. Most of this takes place in an impressive (and rather attractive) building, with all the industrial elements neatly arranged and labelled, where the outcome is the powering of huge turbines that deliver electricity 24/7 to the grid. The un-used solid residue, a small fraction of what came in, goes to landfill – a bit of which is to a specialist unit for ‘hazardous’ material.

Over the 30yrs for which this is currently contracted Greatmoor is due to yield £150m beyond its original commissioning costs, and it looks like this will be achieved easily. We were impressed by the good forward thinking that has meant the facility has been able to run for the 2yrs since commissioning without stopping apart from scheduled maintenance which takes 3 weeks, and never exceeding its emission limits.

Following the visit we were all ready for lunch at a picturesque pub with plenty of room for us to sit outdoors in comfortable shade on this hot day. However, fate and staff shortages demanded that we exercised patience before tucking in. Many thanks to Sue for her organisation and also the drivers who took us to and from the venue with minimal environmental impact.

Visit to Household Cavalry Museum              A report by Ian Griffith         

On Tuesday the 11th September, 27 of us visited the Household Cavalry Museum at Combermere  Barracks in Windsor.

We were looked after throughout our visit by the Curator and three Volunteers who made us very welcome and told us many stories about their own experiences in the regiment.

We heard about the history of the Household Cavalry Regiments from 1660 to the present day and were told that the Household Cavalry is the oldest serving regiment in the British Army.

We viewed the Medal Collection which holds 200 medals covering all campaigns from Waterloo to the present day.

We then visited the Equitation Wing to meet the horses which are known as Household Cavalry Blacks. Nobody was bitten but plenty of mints were consumed!!

Then we went off to the Armoured Vehicle Park to view some of the vehicles used in current operational reconnaissance. Combermere Barracks is the operational site for the regiment.

Lunch was taken in the Cookhouse with the soldiers and then we visited the Warrant Officers and Non Commissioned Officers Mess for a well earned drink, £2.00 for a large glass of excellent wine !!

Finally we went back to the Museum to hear about the Ceremonial Role of the Regiment which has 280 horses.

Then to the highlight of the visit, our good friend Barrie Luscombe dressing up in Ceremonial Uniform, I think he thought he was a General!! And then we had Trooper Kay looking refreshed after a couple of pints!!

Everyone agreed that we had a very enjoyable and memorable day visiting one of the world’s greatest regiments.

 

                                                                                                             

                

               

Visit to Household